Tag Archives: bridge

Sculptures in the Gardens

’twas the day hubby was leaving and of course it is a beautiful day, so off to the Botanical Gardens we went to while away an hour.
All the usual suspects were there, the arch, pretty flowers, the duck pond, Japanese Gardens (complete with tourists taking pictures with their iPads, talk about dorky looking!, it just looks so wrong)…..

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And then there were the sculptures. Ten Days on the Island (I’ll find a link for another day) is coming up, or is it already here. Anyway, it is full of art instillations and wineries, and are showing all across the state with lots of strange things popping up. Art is subjective after all. There were no signs for the ticks and crosses, but the castle is part of it…..

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And a massive rusty cosmetic mirror, I don’t want to meet the owner of that one.

Chilly Tuesday

After the last post, I thought something nice would be good.
I thought I’d chill out – literally, the sea breeze is fresh, a far cry from yesterday’s beautiful temperature – near the water at Cornelian Bay for a bit. A few kilometres north of the city and nestled a stones throw from the main highway. It is surprisingly quiet given the proximity but with children’s playground and seagulls abound, the traffic noise fades away…

Given the clouds and lack of direct sunshine, The Mountain (Mount Wellington) is not so clear in my picture. And I’m sure still freezing as all hell on top. It is now covered with that rain cloud we were promised and looks decidedly grey and ugly.

The Boatsheds, quite infamous round the parts and then a view of The Bridge (Tasman Bridge) with the city located to the right on the other side of the hill.

The hill, Queens Domain, houses the athletics club, tennis courts where they hold the ANZ International (or whatever they call it) in January (remember it is summer at that time here), the Aquatic centre and Tas Cricket Club. Although most games are played at Bellerieve (on the other side of the river, not visible).
Also we have the Botanical Gardens and Government House (how could I have forgotten these in the original post, shame)

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Not wanting to scare people (kids and photos and creepy people and all that) I won’t take a picture of The Boatshed. A bistro/cafe/restaurant near the park that overlooks the water and is by all accounts, quite good. Come summer they do a roaring trade with their kiosk and ice creams available through the side window. Perfectly positioned to take in the views and allow for outdoor eating on those long summer evenings.

Take a step onto the bridge… and see where it takes you

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Bridges – another picture essay…

The other week when C and I were starting our (soon-to-fail-but-unbeknownst-to-us) road trip we passed through several small historical towns that have beautiful bridges. Plus another with a very cool Windmill, used for the milling of flour way back when.

Richmond.

oldest bridge still in use in Australia

After Richmond and continuing up the highway we came to Oatlands.

 

From Oatlands it was a short drive north to the lovely leafy town of Ross.  And a late lunch(?) of ice cream…

hmmm... headless ducks.

hmmm... headless ducks.

and a Church out on it's own on the top of the hill.

Keep smiling 🙂
Jennifer

A walk amongst the tree tops.

My fear of heights was tested again today. We took a trip to the Tahune Airwalk, Geeveston.  A 90 min drive west from home.  We left home early to make sure we had enough time – we were on a time frame today, an airport trip and Air League meeting took preference over a full day girls trip out.

Did I make it to the end...?

I know the supports are well made. I know they are doing their job.  I am not afraid of it falling down. Even when it creaks and groans. I just don’t like the space between me and the ground – without the support poles.

Getting there right on opening was the best part.  We had the whole track to ourselves! It was peaceful but for the birds and the weather was perfect, even with a small shower.
Walking onto the track I got the first wave of nerves.   Don’t get me wrong, the place is beautiful and being the same height as the trees is pretty awesome.  It’s not often you get to look the tree right in the eye (so to speak).

the start of the track

lookin' down...

By the time we got halfway along I was feeling a bit jittery.  Being brave and walking a lot slower than I would have probably added to it.  I’m not complaining, taking my time was lovely, and I paid more attention to the scenery. Just.

looking towards the river with a light rain

Just before the end of the walk you get to a T-junction – turn right and you head to solid ground. Turn left and there is one last support and then the cantilever… dangerous ground, or non ground.  We turned left and wandered towards the end.  I had to do it.  Bite the bullet.  If my kids were there I can guarantee I would not have stepped foot on it. But with no one to bounce it or make fun I said “…I’m off…” and went for it.  It is only about 10m (30ft) to the end but when there is no support I feel the height more than ever.   I did stop twice before I actually got to the end, and there is evidence that I did it!  I haven’t seen it but am told it was there to show hubby the proof, lol.

looking through the glass wall at the very end.... beautiful! (even with the reflections)

The view is fantastic from that vantage point, two of our best known wild rivers converging and a continuous view of World Heritage forests.

looking upriver to the junction of the Picton (left) and the Huon (right) rivers

I have to admit, I don’t really know how I feel about what I did today.  I am proud of myself to a certain degree, I conquered a part of my fear after all.  But I wasn’t totally comfortable with it.  I was at the end taking pictures and part of me felt silly for being scared about something like while the rest of me wanted to cry out and leave as fast as I could.

On the way out we went to see The Big Tree. The ‘biggest’ (read heaviest) tree in at least the southern hemisphere…

looking up at the big tree... a 6m/18ft girth and 87m (260ft) height

This is a definite ‘have to return’ place as there are three other walks we would love to do with two rivers crossings (swinging bridges no less) so after the cantilever we headed back home.

bridge crossing the Huon

logs stuck under the bridge - 4m up. Those waters get pretty high.

we were here

Keep smiling 🙂
Jennifer